ADDYS Recognize Excellence in Student Work

BSC GDC Students Win Share of Awards

The North Dakota chapter of the American Advertising Federation, AAFND or AdFed, recently held its annual awards show – the Addys – in Fargo. BSC Graphic Design and Communications students competed in the juried competition against other students of two and four year institutions represented in the district.

This year, seven BSC sophomore students won nine awards for their outstanding demonstrations in design and photography. MiKayla Pfaff won a Gold Addy for a digital illustration of a gold pocket watch. Josh Schaefbauer won a gold for his studio photography piece entitled ‘Let’s Drink’. Parker Bachmeier won two Silver Addys for his personal stationery design and a poster design for the BSC Theatrical Production of ‘The Foreigner’. Brandon Veen won a Silver Addy for his poster design for the BSC Theatrical Production of ‘How I Learned to Drive’. Aaron Bechtle won a Silver Addy for his studio photograph entitled ‘Coffee Delight’. Jessica Edinger won two silvers for her studio photographs entitled ‘Spice Your Life’ and ‘Drink’. Larree Janssen won a Silver Addy for her photography ‘Dragonfly’.

All Gold Addy Award winners are automatically forwarded for judging at the District 8 Addy Competition that will take place in Green Bay, WI on March 23.

The GDC graduating class of 2017 won a Gold Addy for the sixth edition of PROOF Magazine, an all student designed and produced publication. Since 2012, PROOF magazine has collected three Addy Awards. The seventh edition of PROOF is currently in production.

Several Graphic Design and Communications graduates were also part of award-winning projects this year. Rob Burke, Jamie Vetter, Caleb Hauff, Nathan Long and Jade Neumann were among the alumni honored with Addys as well. Neumann, a 2017 graduate, was awarded two Silver Addys. One for the ‘Shortcuts’ Poster Design and the other for ‘Create’, an illustration. Long, a 2016 graduate now attending Moorhead State University, shared in a Gold Addy for a web site design for ‘The Fargo Project’. This entry also received the only ‘Best of Digital’ Student Award. Burke, 2009 graduate and owner of Yarn Media, received 3 Gold Addys and 1 Silver for his cinematography and editing work. Vetter, also a 2009 graduate, netted four Addys – a Silver with co-creator of the Shortcuts Poster, Jade Neumann, and three Addys as part of his work with Agency Mabu. Hauff, 2014 graduate and co-founder of Threefold, shared in over ten awards – four Gold Addys, five Silver Addys and the only Best of Show given this year.

Congratulations to all award winners and all of the students that entered. Because the Addy is universally recognized by the creative industry as a signature achievement, receiving one is great validation for the professional and creative work produced by our GDC students.

MiKayla Pfaff’s digital illustration of a gold pocket watch received a Gold Addy.

Josh Schaefbauer’s Moscow Mule in ‘Let’s Drink’ captured a Gold Addy.

Parker Bachmeier’s personal stationery package received a Silver Addy.

Bachmeier also received a Silver Addy for his poster for ‘The Foreigner’.

Brandon Veen received a Silver Addy for his ‘How I Learned to Drive’ play poster.

A Silver Addy was awarded to Aaron Bechtle for his ‘Coffee Delight’ photo.

Jessica Edinger won a Silver Addy for her ‘Spice Your Life’ photo.

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Larree Janssen’s up-close-and-personal photo of this dragonfly won a Silver Addy.

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Nathan Long (2016 graduate), won a Gold and Best of Student, Digital for his collaboration on ‘The Fargo Project’ web site.

The Silver Addy Award-winning Shortcuts poster was a joint effort between Jamie Vetter (2009 graduate) and Jade Neumann (2017 graduate).

Jade Neumann’s illustrated ‘Create’ design won a Silver Addy.

Motion and Sound with After Effects

Second year students in the Graphic Design and Communications Intro to Multimedia course recently completed an assignment where they used After Effects to incorporate movement and sound to introduce themselves. Students worked diligently using what basics they knew to incorporate some advanced techniques inspired by more popular television intros. All in all the results were impressive. Here are just a few.

Reality: Illustrated

The first year students recently completed one of the most time-consuming and technical assignments of the first semester: the vector product illustration. Success of this particular assignment hinges largely on the reference image as well as the quality of the path construction. Sampling colors and building custom gradients contribute greatly to achieving photorealism.

hammersmark_animation

Patrick Hammersmark

decoteau_animation

Meggan Decoteau

pfaff_animation

MiKayla Pfaff

wit_animation

Witney Nielsen

schaefbauer_animation

Josh Schaefbauer

emmil_animation

Courtney Emmil

murphy_animation

Jackson Murphy

Hink Pink

Freshmen students recently completed their first vector drawings using Adobe Illustrator and the pen tool. These illustrations were based on an earlier analog assignment where they needed to visually depict a hink pink, or two-word rhyming riddle and render it in ink. The original drawings were scanned and placed into Illustrator so that they could trace over them using the vector drawing tools they’ve learned over the past several weeks. See if you can guess these hink pinks riddles.

foxbox
smartheart
bigpig
bearchair
chillpill
leafthief
mimetime
polarmolar

TV Title Typography

Type is a powerful design element, one that greatly influences the mood and emotion of any creation. When era-specific typefaces and styles are used in a design the perceived age of that design changes accordingly.

First year students in BSC’s Graphic Design and Communication’s Typography class recently demonstrated how, just by changing a typeface, a modern television program can be transported back to an earlier time.

Click on the image above to load some examples of vernacular TV titles.

Click on the image above to load some examples of vernacular TV titles.

Movement for Mobile

Second year students in the Graphic Design and Communications program recently covered how to utilize Adobe Animate to execute HTML5, mobile-ready, browser-controlled animations. In the span of a few weeks students created animations that were to engage the user and link their original brands to a national cause/movement. Adobe Animate focuses on achieving mobile-friendly, efficient vector animation using javascript and HTML5’s canvas feature rather than rely on Flash’s vulnerable Flash Player.

Click on the images below to see a few examples.

 

CFlanaganAnimation

Cori Flanagan masters fluid movement with her ‘Monster Munchies’ character.

NWeaverAnimation

Nicole Weaver pours on the ‘Sweet Piggy’ BBQ sauce.

ALongAnimation

The buzz is about local, organic freshness in this ad by Adam Long.

DTrippAnimation

Daisy Tripp’s animation has us tripping on ‘Daisy’s Donuts’.

History’s Rolodex

Business cards are some of the most common brand identity elements designers are asked to create. So what if your brand is a fairly notable individual? First year students in the Typography class recently completed an assignment where they had to imagine and design a business card for an actual or fictitious character. After conducting some research as to who their character was they had to make design choices that reflected the era in which they lived. They were to consider typographic styles and details that would help the finished card appear as legitimate as possible. Typography is often a hit or miss proposition but with some historical context the choices can become more obvious.

HistoricBCs

Some notable business card designs from a handful of students. (Clockwise from left to right: Annette Pickard, Lindsay Swaidner, Hannah Schafer, Preston Murschel, Ashley Rudnick and Kelsey Nicholson.)

Emotional Bunch

The first year students in Sean Thorenson’s Digital Illustration class recently executed their first original vector drawings. Using a scanned image of their hand drawn inking, the pen tool and a lot of patience, the students created this motley crew. This image may appear to be inked, but it is a 100% digital vector creation.
EmotionCollage

Illustrating with Style

This exercise proves that there is more than one way to draw ANYthing.

This exercise proves that there is more than one way to draw ANYthing.

The designer’s ability to work creatively with style can greatly change the personality and message of a piece. In this illustration project students selected an object and drew it in nine different ways while varying their style each time. The end product, if done correctly, looks like the work of nine individual designers.