On display

Second-year students spend their first semester Fridays working on display case design. The project does double duty by working as a teaching tool and making our hallway more attractive.

The students are divided into two groups with each choosing a topic related to graphic design in some way. One group chose to cover the principles of design – the basic foundational rules that design is based on and the other group wanted to explain the screen printing process.

Both cases turned out great and do a wonderful job showcasing the things we teach in the Graphic Design and Communications program.

Updating the dining experience

 

The GDC staff are big fans of the Bismarck State College Mystic Marketplace. If you aren’t on campus frequently or don’t know much about BSC, the Mystic Marketplace is the dining hall. The food is great and the staff are very nice people, plus, they have free ice cream on Wednesdays and Fridays.

Food Services Manager Mike Wavrin pointed out a few weeks ago that the wide open tile walls were begging for art work, so we put the freshmen GDC students to work fixing that problem.

Each student piece is the same size – 7 3/4 inches by 15 1/2 inches, half of the students did a vertical layout and the other half had to use a horizontal design. Students were further constrained with a design style, possibly using other students’ thumbnail sketches or a continuous line drawing. Some students were limited to only working with type, others had to use photos for their piece.

The finished wall looks great and the Mystic Marketplace staff has been very complimentary. The students like it too – most stuck around and shot a photo of the installation.

History’s Rolodex

Business cards are some of the most common brand identity elements designers are asked to create. So what if your brand is a fairly notable individual? First year students in the Typography class recently completed an assignment where they had to imagine and design a business card for an actual or fictitious character. After conducting some research as to who their character was they had to make design choices that reflected the era in which they lived. They were to consider typographic styles and details that would help the finished card appear as legitimate as possible. Typography is often a hit or miss proposition but with some historical context the choices can become more obvious.

HistoricBCs

Some notable business card designs from a handful of students. (Clockwise from left to right: Annette Pickard, Lindsay Swaidner, Hannah Schafer, Preston Murschel, Ashley Rudnick and Kelsey Nicholson.)