One button made my life Photoshop world better

I don’t know how I missed this shortcut for so many years, but it has made my photo editing workflow a little smoother.

I really like the tools in the camera raw editor for photo toning and color work, but I don’t like the way that it handles cloning and the lack of layers. The drawback with the raw editor for me has been that after I click the Open Image button at the bottom of the screen, my raw editing tools are gone.

There is a way to go back and forth between the raw editor and Photoshop seamlessly. With the raw file open in the raw editor, hold down the Shift key, the Open Image button will change to Open Object. The raw image is opened in Photoshop, but it is a Smart Object, you can modify the image in Photoshop and double clicking it will allow changes to made in the raw editor again. You can go back and forth between the Photoshop and the raw editor as often as necessary.

Unfortunately, if you do your raw editing in Lightroom, I don’t believe there is a way to work back and forth.

On display

Second-year students spend their first semester Fridays working on display case design. The project does double duty by working as a teaching tool and making our hallway more attractive.

The students are divided into two groups with each choosing a topic related to graphic design in some way. One group chose to cover the principles of design – the basic foundational rules that design is based on and the other group wanted to explain the screen printing process.

Both cases turned out great and do a wonderful job showcasing the things we teach in the Graphic Design and Communications program.

Motion and Sound with After Effects

Second year students in the Graphic Design and Communications Intro to Multimedia course recently completed an assignment where they used After Effects to incorporate movement and sound to introduce themselves. Students worked diligently using what basics they knew to incorporate some advanced techniques inspired by more popular television intros. All in all the results were impressive. Here are just a few.

2017 Halloween stop motion animations

Each year the freshmen students learn a tiny bit about stop motion animation through a collaborative project that focuses on Halloween. The groups of students have a little more than an hour to come up with an idea, then execute it with white board markers, taking a photo each time the action changes. Check out the videos at the links below.

Group 1 video

Group 2 video

Group 3 video

Group 4 video

Can I get you something to drink?

The sophomore Graphic Design and Communications students just wrapped up beverage photography with impressive results. The project requires planning ahead and plenty of editing work after the shooting is done.

One story, two tails

The past few years the sophomores have worked on a small group project in their Current Imaging II class illustrating a short story using photography.

The goal of the assignment is to get the students thinking critically about what kind of images to create to match the text and make them apply skills learned in the classroom to outside situations. On top of that, it gets students reacquainted with classmates.

The results are always interesting, they often make the viewer look at the short stories, words that almost everyone has heard, in a new way. The following pieces are well done and very interesting – they showcase the same story in two different ways.

Looking for alumni work

Bismarck State College’s literary magazine, More Tales From the Wasteland is looking for alumni art submissions to publish to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of the publication. Submit artwork to: publishthis@figmentsofimagination.org. The submission deadline is March 19, 2017.

Groovy movies

One of the best parts of being a teacher in the Graphic Design and Communications Department is watching students grow.

The sophomores are only a couple months from graduation and they have really figured out how to apply all of the pieces of their education. The movie posters they created based on real or fictional films are exceptional. The main photo for each piece was shot by the student and they handled the design as well.

It never really happened

The idea of green and blue screen special effects is common in movies, but it’s widely used in the world of photography as well. It sounds easy, but it is a very tricky undertaking. It’s difficult to match lighting scenarios, perspectives and even the relative size of subjects to the backgrounds.

The subjects in these photos were shot in the BSC Graphic Design and Communications photo studio against a green screen, then inserted into the image.